Spotlight on: Victorian Novels

Hi everyone,

I’m back again with another “Spotlight on:…” blog post! This time it’s about my favourite Victorian novels and why I find reading books from the Victorian era so appealing.

**I found that a lot of my favourite Victorian novels actually ended up being the same as my favourite Gothic Literature novels, so I’ve tried to be a bit more varied in my suggestions and not mention books in my previous “Spotlight on:…” post**

Victorian literature was produced during the reign of Queen Victoria during 1837-1901 in Great Britain. The Victorian era was a time of massive social change and this was well-reflected in a lot of the literature of that time. I like reading about this time period as the books are able to give me some idea of what people’s daily lives were like during these turbulent times.

One major characteristic of most Victorian novels is that there’s normally a person or group of people who have been wronged in some way and are setting out for justice and/or working hard to overcome the wrong that has been done unto them. The concepts of justice and hard work were popularised as the moral and better way of living.

Class was massively important during the Victorian era and often dictated people’s lives, though this didn’t mean that people couldn’t progress and move up the class-ladder towards a higher class (as is often the case in Victorian novels). Because of this class barrier, life for women during the Victorian era was often very difficult; they had minimal rights to property and their children, and often the only careers available to the poorer women were dressmaking or factory work.

I think it’s a fascinating period, if not just for it’s influence on how we live today but also because of how these novels have withstood the test of time and are still popular today!

Here are some of my favourite Victorian novels:

Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

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Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

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The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins

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Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens

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A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

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Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

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I’m always open to more suggestions of Victorian novels to add to my reading list!

Thank you for reading!

Zoe xx

 

 

 

 

10 thoughts on “Spotlight on: Victorian Novels

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  1. The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins and Great Expectation by Charles Dickens were both great reads. I will admit I enjoyed The Woman in White a bit more. I read that one in chunks once a week just like it was originally published.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Oh, I love Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde! I also like Cranford and Wives and Daughters by Elizabeth Gaskell, and Tenant of Wildfell Hall and Agnes Grey by Anne Bronte. I find Gaskell does a very good job commenting on Victorian society and the changes it went through, especially in terms of industrialisation.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ve been meaning to read Cranford for ages! And North and South.
      I recently read Agnes Grey and loved it! The setting was beautiful and I thought she wrote very realistically about being a governess!
      Thanks so much for your recommendations!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. No problem! I also loved the realism in Agnes Grey. I found I could relate to some of the experiences a little which made it a better read all round.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. So, I haven’t read The Woman in White, but I did read Moonstone by Wilkie Collins and struggled with it. Would you say The Woman in White is similar? Or maybe different enough I should give it a chance?

    Liked by 1 person

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